The Hogsmill Project

Latest News:

Setting up day team - Peter, Freda, Lesley, Becky, Philip, Sue (behind camera!)
Setting up day team - Peter, Freda, Lesley, Becky, Philip, Sue (behind camera!)30-Jul-2011 15:06, SONY DSC-W310, 4.3, 5.2mm, 0.003 sec, ISO 100

As local historian June Sampson once said, Kingston upon Thames could easily have been Kingston upon Hogsmill. KUTAS is delighted to have been awarded a Heritage Lottery Fund grant to investigate the very early life of this under-rated river and its significance in the development of the town.

In the summer of 2011 the Society conducted a week-long investigation on a site alongside the Hogsmill at Tolworth. Archaeologists are now using the findings to reconstruct the environmental history of the site, discover how vegetation changed over the centuries, identify the river’s prehistoric channels, and find out what  human beings might have been doing there.

Borehole Cores
Borehole Cores02-Aug-2011 01:36, FUJIFILM FinePix S1000fd , 2.8, 5.9mm, 0.008 sec, ISO 64

Helping out, and learning how to be archaeologists, were Kingston’s Scouts and many other children from 9 to 17 years old. The project took place on open land used by the Scouts as an Activity Centre. You can review our enthusiasm and progress in our Field Diary.

In May and June 2012 the results will be on display at Kingston Museum, along with all our research into the history of this fascinating stream, in an exhibition entitled The Hogsmill – A Journey through Time.

Please see below for all the information and news as we gather together all our findings, research, maps, documents, and reports.

Volunteers welcome – email KUTAS if you’d like to volunteer to help with more research or the exhibition.

‘The Hogsmill: A Journey Through Time’

An exhibition ‘The Hogsmill: A Journey Through Time’ will run at Kingston Museum between the 19th May and 14th July. KUTAS Hogsmil Project Exhibition Press Release (May 2012) In August last year a community archaeology ‘dig’ and survey took place on the banks of the Hogsmill River at Southwood Activity Centre, Tolworth. The fieldwork was [...]

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KUTAS Hogsmill Project Report

The initial report on the KUTAS lead research and fieldwork undertaken for Phase 1 of the Hogsmill Community Archaeological Project. Summary of Report: A borehole, test pitting, and metal detecting survey took place at Southwood Activity Centre between 30th July and 7th August 2011, as part of a community archaeology project, funded by the Heritage [...]

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The Hogsmill Exhibition Working Group (HEWG !)

The KuTAS committee has now formed a new working group which is designing and managing the planned exhibition for May 2012. The group includes committee members, the Treasurer, and also three members from Kingston Museum, who are inputting their time and expertise into helping us with our first major exhibition. The group has held several [...]

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Hogsmill Project – C14 analysis of findings

We have some provisional information from Reading Univeristy confirming that the C14 dating has been successful: “The radiocarbon dates have been returned, they are stratigraphic order as follows: 2.15m BGS (willow/poplar wood) – 7350-7060 cal BC (9300-9010 cal BP) 2.79m BGS (unidentified twig) – 8600-8300 cal BC (10550-10250 cal BP) As I hope you will [...]

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Hogsmill Project

As local historian June Sampson once said, Kingston upon Thames could easily have been Kingston upon Hogsmill. KUTAS is delighted to have been awarded a Heritage Lottery Fund grant to investigate the very early life of this under-rated river and its significance in the development of the town. This summer the Society will be conducting [...]

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THE HOGSMILL: Life and Times

Hogsmill River

The river is only about six miles long, rising in Ewell and discharging into the Thames in the middle of Kingston’s Charter Quay. Known in the 16th century as the Lourtebourne (muddy or dirty stream), it  certainly did not look like the river we know today,  much of which is now directed into conduits within [...]

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